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Irish Grass Mineral Analysis Report  #MineralsMatter – April 2020

Irish Grass Mineral Analysis Report #MineralsMatter – April 2020

Grass samples were collected across the country in the last week of April. During this period, we saw good grass growth combined with warm sunshine and limited rain across the region. These weather conditions were a stark contrast to those being experienced when the first samples were collected in February.

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – February 2020

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – February 2020

Thanks to storms Ciara, Dennis and Jorge during the month of February in Ireland we experienced prolonged periods of heavy rainfall which resulted in extensive flooding across the country. It was recorded that certain places had 1.5 to 3.3 times the normal monthly rainfall for February.

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – Jan 2020

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – Jan 2020

December/January grass mineral values and the best products to use for out-grazing ewes. Uniblock’s latest grass testing is to help inform farmers’ decisions on supplementing grazing pregnant ewes with trace elements and minerals this winter to protect flock productivity, fertility and health and to ensure the viability of their unborn lambs.

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – October 2019

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – October 2019

Results from our grass samples collected across the country in the month of October are quite different to what we seen back in July. Average Nitrogen levels in the grass are somewhat higher in October (3.5%) compared to grass sampled in July (2.8%). We also seen an increase in levels of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and aluminium over the last three months (see table 1).

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – July 2019

What’s in your grass? #MineralsMatter – July 2019

Magnesium and sodium levels on average across the 10 samples is relatively low. The risk of grass staggers may increase with lower levels of magnesium in the herbage; however, it is not a reliable measure on its own. Sodium levels are also important when considering magnesium disorders in animals.

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